Mold

Where are molds found?

black mold 1Molds are found in virtually every environment and can be detected, indoors and outdoors, year round. Mold growth is encouraged by warm and humid conditions. Outdoors they can be found in shady, damp areas or places where leaves or other vegetation is decomposing. Indoors they can be found where humidity levels are high, such as basements or showers. Indoor mold growth should be avoided. Molds reproduce by means of tiny spores; the spores are invisible to the naked eye and float through outdoor and indoor air. Mold may begin growing indoors when mold spores land on surfaces that are wet. There are many types of mold, and none of them will grow without water or moisture.

Can mold cause health problems?

Molds are usually not a problem indoors, unless mold spores land on a wet or damp spot and begin growing. Molds have the potential to cause health problems. Molds produce allergens (substances that can cause allergic reactions), irritants, and in some cases, potentially toxic substances (mycotoxins). Inhaling or touching mold or mold spores may cause allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. Allergic responses include hay fever-type symptoms, such as sneezing, runny nose, red eyes, and skin rash (dermatitis). Allergic reactions to mold are common. They can be immediate or delayed. Molds can also cause asthma attacks in people with asthma who are allergic to mold. In addition, mold exposure can irritate the eyes, skin, nose, throat, and lungs of both mold-allergic and non-allergic people.

What do I do if I find mold in my home?black mold 2

The key to mold control is moisture control. If mold is a problem in your home, you should clean up the mold promptly and fix the water problem. It is important to dry water-damaged areas and items within 24-48 hours to prevent mold growth. Depending on the size of the area affected, you may need to hire a professional remediation service to rid your home of mold. Before attempting to remove mold yourself, seek out advice from a professional. Some mold can be toxic and it is not safe to attempt removal on your own.

For more information, please visit:

Centers for Disease Control (CDC): www.cdc.gov/mold/faqs.htm

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): www.epa.gov/mold/moldguide.html#Can

To speak with a local public health professional, please contact Public Health Solutions at 402-826-3880 or email info@phsneb.org

Also check out a public service flyer here!